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    Sports website Fanjuicer.com recently surveyed 1,488 fans to rank each NFL team's logo. They then had a professional graphic designer critique each one. We view that as muscling in on our territory, so we're responding here with our own design analysis of all 32 teams' logos. Click on a logo and get ready to learn.


    Pittsburgh Steelers
    This looks like you let your child paint the front of your Subaru
    Oakland Raiders
    Here's a tough warrior who can easily see and dispatch anyone who approaches him (as long as they come from his left side)
    Detroit Lions
    This lion works as a mime who climbs invisible staircases
    Houston Texans
    "It should look like a bull who idolizes Paul Stanley"
    L.A. Chargers
    This looks like a superhero worm with the ability to generate current
    Cleveland Browns
    Oh come on, you're not even trying. Isn't this part of the stock art for a Microsoft program?
    Cincinnati Bengals
    This hurts my eyes. I see a B, then a JV, then a bunch of black knives that someone uses to stab a graphic designer to death
    Chicago Bears
    I don't like the pretentious little pointy part on the back of the C. As if it's trying to look somehow better and fancier than a B or a D. This lousy C thinks that it's shit doesn't stink
    Kansas City Chiefs
    Is there anything worse than when someone tries to draw random variation and it just comes out consistent? Nice job on the wavy lines of the flinthead. FAIL
    San Francisco 49ers
    This logo tells you three things about the designer: He likes the S on Superman's chest, he owns an ellipse template, and he only has an Associate's Degree
    View the full gallery here

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    Sports website Fanjuicer.com surveyed 1,488 fans to see how they ranked each NFL team's logo. They then got a professional graphic designer to critique each logo, printing their assessment. We view that as muscling in on our territory, so we're responding here with our own design critique of all 32 teams' logos.

    Pittsburgh Steelers

    This looks like you let your child paint the front of your Subaru

    ___________________________________________________ 

    Oakland Raiders

    Here's a tough warrior who can easily see and dispatch anyone who approaches him (as long as they come from his left side)

    ___________________________________________________

    Detroit Lions

    This lion works as a mime who climbs invisible staircases

    ___________________________________________________

    Houston Texans

    "It should look like a bull who idolizes Paul Stanley"

    ___________________________________________________

    L.A. Chargers

    This looks like a superhero worm with the ability to generate current

    ___________________________________________________

    Cleveland Browns

    Oh come on, you're not even trying. Isn't this part of the stock art for a Microsoft program?

    ___________________________________________________

    Cincinnati Bengals

    This hurts my eyes. I see a B, then a JV, then a bunch of black knives that someone uses to stab a graphic designer to death

    ___________________________________________________

    Chicago Bears

    I don't like the pretentious little pointy part on the back of the C. As if it's trying to look somehow better and fancier than a B or a D. This lousy C thinks that it's shit doesn't stink

    ___________________________________________________

    Kansas City Chiefs

    Is there anything worse than when someone tries to draw random variation and it just comes out consistent? Nice job on the wavy lines of the flinthead. FAIL

    ___________________________________________________

    San Francisco 49ers

    This logo tells you three things about the designer: He likes the S on Superman's chest, he owns an ellipse template, and he only has an Associate's Degree

    ___________________________________________________

    Indianapolis Colts

    In college this designer pledged the Omega frat and had a bunch of iron-on logos left over after his T-shirt business failed

    ___________________________________________________

    Baltimore Ravens

    I liked this logo better in its first iteration on the 1960s "Batman" TV show

    ___________________________________________________

    New York Giants

    "Let's make the tail of the Y underline the N. So the Y quite literally underscores the N to emphasize it, highlighting the relationship, the interplay, the dominance and subservience of the two letters within the context of--" OH MY GOD SHUT UP, SHUT UP. I WILL PUNCH YOU

    ___________________________________________________

    New York Jets

    This looks like a doormat. I want to wipe my feet on it

    ___________________________________________________

    Jacksonville Jaguars

    This jaguar wandered into a 7-11, helped himself to a Slurpee and is now being confronted by Animal Control

    ___________________________________________________

    New England Patriots

    This looks like it tastes like Sam Adams

    ___________________________________________________

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers

    It makes no sense that you would attach a flag to a sword. It would just cut the flag and the wind would carry it away and you'd look like a real jerk

    ___________________________________________________

    Miami Dolphins

    This looks like Aquaman was trying to find himself and experimenting with different chest logos

    ___________________________________________________

    Tennessee Titans

    Given America's current political climate, the intertwined blue and red flames are a little too on-the-nose for me

    ___________________________________________________

    Washington Redskins

    This looks like a Native American wearing a spacesuit bubble helmet where he put feathers on the outside, too. We get it, the feathers are important

    ___________________________________________________

    Dallas Cowboys

    This looks like it was designed by a colorblind Vietnamese patriot

    ___________________________________________________

    Seattle Seahawks

    Does the U.S. Postal Service have a football team?

    ___________________________________________________

    Buffalo Bills

    This looks like a medical cutaway diagram illustrating an ill-advised pathway for a lobotomy

    ___________________________________________________

    Green Bay Packers

    This looks like the logo on a jar from a company that makes gherkins

    ___________________________________________________

    New Orleans Saints

    The fleur-de-lis is a symbol of the French monarchy, which hasn't been a factor since the 19th century. What better way to strike terror into the hearts of an opposing team

    ___________________________________________________

    Philadelphia Eagles

    It's an eagle, but an angry one, you can tell by the eyes

    ___________________________________________________

    Carolina Panthers

    It's a panther, but an angry one, you can tell by the eyes

    ___________________________________________________

    Arizona Cardinals

    It's a cardinal, but an angry one, you can tell by the eyes

    ___________________________________________________

    Denver Broncos

    It's a horse, but an angry one, you can tell by the eyes. And also because the other horses keep calling him "Ginger"

    ___________________________________________________

    Minnesota Vikings

    This poor-postured Viking with chronic lower back pain

    ___________________________________________________

    Atlanta Falcons

    This looks like a bird that has an H.R. Giger alien popping out of its chest

    ___________________________________________________

    St. Louis Rams

    "I know that rams don't have their mouths open when they butt heads, but I want this to look like a mouth-breathing ram"



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    The Delirium Chair is a tribute to a balance between city and nature, artificial and natural, Techne and Psyche. Its form flows organically but also reminds us of rigid systems like highways.

    View the full project here

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    This unassuming-looking cottage in Posonsby, New Zealand, was recently renovated by owner Jonathan Smith, principal of Auckland-based Matter Architects.

    Facade, before
    Facade, after

    By expanding the rear of the house, Smith more than tripled the interior space from 90 square meters (968 sq. ft) to 310 square meters (3,337 sq. ft.).

    Rear of the house, before. If you refer to the satellite dish on the roof of the neighboring house to the right...
    ...you can get a sense of how far the house was expanded rearwards.

    In our opinion, the most impressive part of the renovation has to do with the facade. Street parking is scarce in the area, so Smith worked out a way to fit two cars inside the house, converting a bedroom into a garage with a lift, hidden behind what appear to be ordinary exterior walls:

    Garaging provision in the traditional sense was impossible--requiring the controversial decision to install a drive-in garage and car stacker in what was originally the front left bedroom. Carving out portions of the villa, adding masonry wall structures, and retaining [sic] facilitated the car stacker installation. Giving way to a garage door, the original villa façade has been maintained in a seamless manner by retaining the weatherboards and joinery, and integrating a hinged door for vehicle access.

    The interior of the house isn't too shabby either.

    You can read details of the renovation and see more shots here.


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    When you're at the bar with fellow creatives, ideas for inventions can flow. After four IPAs you think you're da Vinci. But few of us ever see these brew-borne ideas to fruition.

    UK-based engineer Charlie Lyons, however, actually did. Years ago Lyons was at a pub with a pal. Said pal's wife was in a wheelchair, and the difficulties of navigating an urban environment in one were recounted. Lyons cooked up a crazy idea for an invention and built it to see if it would work.

    It did. That was back in the mid-'90s, and since that time Lyons' company, Sesame Access, has been building these:

    Here's how they look in action:

    The company has built and installed over 100 such systems, primarily at institutions (universities, museums, government buildings) around the UK. There are limitations to the approach; you can see by the cutaways above how much space and infrastructure are required, and the presumed high cost is what limits the customer base to institutions. But building a business that has been around for 35 years and provides a useful service, all based on an idea borne in a pub, is a damn sight better than most of us have done.

    See you folks at the bar tonight?


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    The Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices (JJMDC) Industrial Design and Human Factors (IDHF) organization is seeking a multi-faceted, exceptionally talented, user-centered Assistant UI/UX designer who is passionate about improving the quality of people's lives through compelling design experiences. This position can reside in any of our JJMDC R&D Centers.

    View the full design job here

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    Bould Design is growing and we are looking for an exceptional designer to join our award winning San Mateo studio on a full-time basis. As a part of our team, you will collaborate on all phases of the design process from conceptualization to production. We offer

    View the full design job here

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    I consume a lot of video for work. My viewing is frequently interrupted by phone calls, dogs, delivery people hitting the buzzer, etc. Each time this happens I reflexively hit the spacebar to pause the video--and instead the browser window scrolls down half a screen while the video continues to play.

    German developer Mattias Hemmingsson has a workaround--but one that I'd never consider using. By tapping into the Chrome browser's FaceDetector API (application programming interface), Hemmingsson has created an extension called FacePause. As you've probably surmised, it uses your camera to detect when you look away, and automatically pauses whatever video you're watching.

    I think a lot of people, especially those enamored of technology, would happily use this. I'm always surprised by how much privacy people are willing to trade away for the sake of "convenience," like having a microphone/speaker in your house that's connected to the internet. It recently made the news that an Amazon Echo mistakenly recorded a couple's private conversation in their home, and sent it to someone on their contact list.

    The cameras on my computer set-up are covered, and the mic is muted, unless I have a Skype meeting. I can't imagine a single convenience that would prompt me to do otherwise. Not being able to pause video correctly is a minor annoyance to me, not a dealbreaking hassle.

    My question to you designers is: When does attention to UX go too far? From a functional perspective, FacePause is undeniably a clever use of technology that confers a benefit, however small. Is it too small to justify the cost of privacy? If so, would you use it if, for example, it somehow saved you money, or if the developer paid you to try it out for a month to give feedback?

    Not that Hemmingsson would ever do such a thing. "I don't trust my webcam," he told Gizmodo, "so I have it covered and I don't trust Youtube/Google so see this more as an experiment of Chrome's new technology, than a product you'd use every day."



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    During NYCxDesign, we were lucky enough to snag a seat at Helsinki-based Restaurant Nolla's Zero Waste Bistro pop-up located in the halls of WantedDesign Manhattan. We typically don't cover the food space, but we were mystified by this pop-up's interior design. From the wall's recycled material to the thoughtful menu to the classic decor, including Alvar Aalto-designed lamps and stools, eating at the restaurant felt exactly like transporting straight to Helsinki, Finland while in the midst of furniture fair chaos. 

    We were particularly taken by the walls, which esteemed Finnish industrial designer and collaborator for this space Harri Koskinen noted were not the original intent for the bistro. Initially, the team opted for a cardboard material sourced from a Finland-based manufacturing company, but when the deal fell through last minute, they were in a scramble attempting to source a new, equally as eco-friendly material.

    The result of that panic moment ended up working much better than cardboard if you ask us—don't you love when design solutions end up superior to the initial plan? The pictured material, which upon closer look is made from recycled "Just Water" Tetra Paks and is actually sourced from a company called Re-Wall based in Iowa. 

    In terms of everything but the walls, Durat supplied the material for the table and trays, and Finnish Design Shop supplied the stools, tableware and lighting. The Finnish Cultural Institute in New York was acted as the orchestrator, bringing the various parts of the collaboration together. 

    The food was delicious, the material decisions were smart, and the best part? Everything was zero waste (since the tableware, lighting and stools were loaned, we think this counts). 


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    I'm digging how Coleman's industrial design team creates new products that pay homage to old form factors. Last year we looked at their 4-in-1 LED Lantern, and this year their 360° Sound and Light Lantern has caught our eye, again for copping the form of an old gas lantern but adding modern-day functionality.

    The water-resistant 360 provides wraparound light, as the name suggests. The rechargeable battery is good for seven hours at maximum brightness (400 lumens), 16 hours on medium and a whopping 40 hours on low. The max brightness duration gets cut down to five hours if use the lantern's other feature simultaneously: See that grill down on the bottom? Yep, it's also a Bluetooth speaker.



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    If you've seen our excellent series on different species of wood, by looking at boards you can identify the ones most commonly used in furniture and homebuilding. But do you know what an actual Poplar, Walnut or Zebrawood tree looks like? Could you actually draw one if you were playing some forestry version of Pictionary?

    Well, here's a visual guide if you're curious:



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    NATEDE is a smart natural air purifier for any home or office. It is a specifically designed flowerpot that combines common plants with technology to purify indoor air. Plants are naturally able to eliminate pollutants. The photocatalytic filter inside NATEDE—which does not need to be replaced—works to eliminate viruses and bacteria.

    The combination of photocatalysis with the design and technology of NATEDE significantly improves the plants' purification power. NATEDE improves indoor pollution, which is five times higher than outdoor pollution. The devicde features five sensors that let users monitor the air quality with a dedicated app.

    View the full project here

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    This year, WantedDesign Manhattan and WantedDesign Brooklyn once again showed a selection of high-quality projects by designers and design students from around the world. Design students may have had the most speculative, thought-provoking projects at each show, but the professional work held its own, making use of unexpected shapes and modernizing traditional products (and even foods!) that haven't been updated since their conception. 

    Kumiko by Kaneka OLED + Michiru Tanaka at WantedDesign Manhattan
    These wall tiles can be arranged in various configurations to light a space in a more interesting way than typical lighting.
    Lexan Series by Phaedo Design at WantedDesign Manhattan
    Phaedo Design created this table out of Lexan.
    Lexan Series by Phaedo Design at WantedDesign Manhattan
    When you take a closer look, the edges of the Lexan shapes are painted a deep blue shade.
    Venus Table by Concrete Cat at WantedDesign Manhattan
    The surface of this Venus table is cast and cut from "Chaos stone," which is a material born out of Concrete Cat's experiment to use remnants from recycled home decor to create something new.
    Venus Table by Concrete Cat at WantedDesign Manhattan
    Learn more about Concrete Cat's eclectic work here.
    Shower Light by Shinya Ito & Kaori Yamamat WantedDesign Manhattan oto
    Tokyo-based design duo Shinya Ito and Kaori Yamamoto were inspired by water falling from the shower when designing this piece.
    Shower Light by Shinya Ito & Kaori Yamamat WantedDesign Manhattan oto
    The lighting feels ethereal, almost like a jellyfish.
    Chair by Filipe Ramos at WantedDesign Manhattan
    This chair uses a rope material that's suitable for both indoor and outdoor placement. Learn more about Ramos' workhere.
    Chair by Filipe Ramos at WantedDesign Manhattan
    Mzamla by Maryam Turkey at WantedDesign Manhattan
    Mazamla is a water cooler inspired by traditional Middle Eastern Terracotta water coolers. The fired clay naturally keeps the water cool, so no electricity is needed. The wall fixture serves as a shelving unit, a planter and water cooler all in one. Learn more about the project here.
    View the full gallery here

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    Who we are We are Apex Tool Group (www.apextoolgroup.com), a $1.5 billion worldwide manufacturer of industrial hand and power tools, tool storage, and electronic soldering products. Apex Tool Group (ATG) and our 8000 associates have built a legacy of powerhouse brands, trusted to get the job done. Our

    View the full design job here

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    Here's an object you've likely never seen before. But by looking at the photos, you should be able to deduce what it's for and how it's operated.

    The first one of you to tell us in the comments wins…nothing! This ain't a game show, folks.

    The images here are examples of early P.O.P. work, concerning a then-new object that had no established form factor, leading to a kind of Wild West of design experimentation. In the 19th century sewing machines became a viable domestic product in America, and as families back then often made and repaired their own clothes, this was a very big deal. General stores around the country were happy to stock the hot item known as spools of thread.

    Manufacturers, wanting their products to stand out, created their own P.O.P. displays for the spools. What's interesting to see is how there was no agreed-upon form factor, even among a single manufacturer. Take a look at a company called Corticelli's smaller countertop models, which came in different sizes and styles.

    This design has a hinged lid at the bottom that allows you to access the gravity-fed spools.

    These two have slot-machine-like dispensers…

    …while this design reminds me of an old cigarette machine (remember those?).

    Some caught customers' eyes by adding mirrors and/or clocks, two things we take for granted today, but which were considered fancy back then.

    Others competed with sheer scale.

    Seeing these for sale today reveals the perversity that is the world of antiques; once highly functional commercial objects, these are now essentially worthless, from a pragmatic point of view, yet can fetch five figures at auction. 

    It's a shame we'll likely never learn the names of the craftsmen who made them.


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    After graduating from the Hokkaido Institute of Design, Norio Tanno pursued his chosen field of furniture design. But he quit after just four years, feeling that his work wasn't original. Instead he turned to creating tiny boxes.

    That was around 40 years ago. He now runs Tanno Studio in Hokkaido, which produces small, useful objects of his own design and made from wood. Tanno makes them in batches and documents the processes on his site.

    Scissors

    USB Stick

    Card Case

    Crazy Door Lock

    What caught my eye most was a photo shot by Kitka Design during a visit to Tanno's shop. One of the craftsmen there made this puzzle-box-style door lock for a cabinet! The tiny storage drawers "need to be opened in a certain pattern to unlock the larger doors."

    Check out the shop visit here, and see more of Tanno's stuff here.


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    The LeBitGo is a unique set of hand tools that transforms the way users get things done around the house and in their daily lives. At its core, LeBitGo is a modular set of bits and attachments. Depending on the configuration of these interchangeable pieces, the tool can function as a screwdriver or light-duty hammer. Users can configure the pieces in virtually any formation, making it easier to operate screws in tight spaces and at awkward angles.

    View the full project here

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    For this year's NYCxDesign, frog partnered with Art Start for the second year in a row to help bring creativity to NYC's homeless and at-risk youth through their DECKxDESIGN challenge. Following a successful inaugural year focused on dart boards, this year pivoted focus towards a different type of board—the skateboard. frog wanted to push the limits and see what would happen if they asked NYC-based artists and design studios to reimagine the classic, run-of-the-mill skateboard, and the results did not disappoint.

    The boards were put on display and made available for auction during a party held at the design firm's Brooklyn-based headquarters. All funds from the auction benefitted Art Start. Below are some of our favorite boards from the challenge, accompanied by descriptions written by each designer/design team themselves and divided into two categories: Technical and Novelty. Unfortunately, a few of the boards we want to include don't have photos available, but the one's we've featured here are a solid representation of the results.

    Technical

    The below boards either have a new form factor we've never seen, include clever design details or an interesting use of material.

    All images taken by Nikola Bradonjic

    Name: Adam Wrigley

    Job Title: Product Architect at frog

    Materials: Polycarbonate ('bulletproof glass'), Aluminum, Steel, Urethane

    Inspiration: Ghost Board is inspired by opposites and is designed to cause a double-take. When ridden, the rider would seem to be floating above the ground. The transparent top of the board appears to be quite fragile, but it is actually extremely durable. It is made of polycarbonate: the same material used in bullet proof glass and fighter jet canopies.

    This beautiful board by SHoP Architects is made from recycled paper scraps, which can be seen in the top image.

    Names: Damon Ahola, Ryan Luce, Joey Pasko, Oliver Sheu, Brent Arnold

    Job Titles: Design and Engineering team at Motivate / Citi Bike 

    Materials: Citi Bike aluminum downtube, 3D printed nylon plastic end caps, bike headlight and taillight, aluminum trucks, polyurethane wheels

    Inspiration: How can we repurpose a decommissioned Citi Bike?

    Name: Karim Rashid

    Company: Karim Rashid

    Materials: pattern printed flooring designed for Parador, ball wheels

    Inspiration: Digital pattern that conveys mobility and speed. Fluidity of its lines are translated into the overall dynamic shape.

    Name: Felipe Castaneda

    Job Title: Industrial Designer at MakerBot

    Materials: MakerBot Tough PLA in Orange

    Inspiration: We wanted to challenge ourselves by creating a fully 3D printed MakerBoard, with no extra materials, that's still lightweight and sturdy enough to ride.

    Name: Piotr Woronkowicz

    Company: Piotrworks x Machinehistories

    Materials: 100% HDPE plastic waste found along the coastline beaches near NYC

    Inspiration: After surfing following a rainstorm that had washed up a disturbing amount of trash onto the beach, I wanted to make this board using the waste polluting our oceans and beaches and think more about creating meaningful and functional products succeeding the materials in their virgin form.

    While visiting a friend at Machinehistories and discussing a few ideas, he showed me an experimental process they were using of shredding and compressing materials under high heat to create new forms and patterns. We used Precious Plastic's free blueprints to build the grinder, and after refining the process, we were able to make this skateboard deck solely from waste collected off a few beaches. This process allows every board to be a one-of-a-kind piece showcasing a new wonderful mingling of color, pattern and history. May you shred on this board filled with infinite colors, shades, patterns and past lives.

    Company: Aruliden

    Materials: white powder-coated 1/8in waterjet steel

    Inspiration: Translating the motion of skateboarding into a functional piece of furniture that anyone can experience.

    Novelty

    We included the following boards because they're just plain fun, intriguing and/or include some good old comic relief.

    Names: XY Feng& Jung Soo Park

    Titles: Designers, frog

    Materials: Thuidium (Fern Moss) & Leucoloryum (Cushion Moss)

    Inspiration: 

    Under the bridge
    In a dark hidden corner
    Lots of you
    Thriving on the cold hard concretes
    This is your spot
    Where you start and spread little by little
    No matter what others think of you

    Name: Brandon Washington

    Title: Design Director, Staple Design

    Material: Faux Alpaca

    Inspiration: Sneakers & Fashion.

    Name: Daniel Venegas Production: Joel Medina + Gerard Sambets

    Job Title: Associate Creative Director at Epic Signal x Mekanism

    Materials: Plexiglass, glycerin, glitter, metal brackets

    Inspiration: The inspiration was the airwalk trick in skateboarding where in mid-air a skater holds the nose of the board and kicks out their feet to appear like they are walking on air. Who's better at walking on air or water for that matter than Jesus? These elements came together in this transparent skateboard along with a baby Jesus to provide riders with the ultimate airwalk.


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    In the picture I am boring a pretty big hole. Pulling the handle of the brace towards or against me is pretty easy, but rotating the handle from left to right when the handle is far way from me is a different story. With my arm outstretched, moving from left to right, I have no leverage, and very little strength. On a small hole this isn't a big deal, but I struggle with larger diameters.

    The solution, with a common American ratcheting brace, is to use the ratchet. Instead of trying to move the handle in complete circles and having no power for the left to right parts of the stroke, I just ratchet the brace forward and back, on the part of the stroke where I have the most arm strength.

    In this manner, drilling a big wide hole becomes pretty darn easy and quick. I think this is one reason why American style ratcheting braces became, in the late 19th century, so popular worldwide and drove the English ultimatum brace out of production before World War One.

    In the picture the green lines show the back and forth part of the powerful part of the stroke where I am ratcheting away, and the red line shows where you have very, very little arm strength by comparison.

    ___________________

    This "Tools & Craft" section is provided courtesy of Joel Moskowitz, founder of Tools for Working Wood, the Brooklyn-based catalog retailer of everything from hand tools to Festool; check out their online shop here. Joel also founded Gramercy Tools, the award-winning boutique manufacturer of hand tools made the old-fashioned way: Built to work and built to last.



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